What does the word readicide and inequity have in common?


Readicide ReadicideRead-i-cide n: The systematic killing of the love of reading, often exacerbated by the inane, mind-numbing practices found in schools. Reading is dying in our schools. Educators are familiar with many of the factors that have contributed to the decline — poverty, second-language issues, and the ever-expanding choices of electronic entertainment. In this provocative new book, Kelly Gallagher suggests, however, that it is time to recognize a new and significant contributor to the death of reading: our schools.
In Readicide, Kelly argues that American schools are actively (though unwittingly) furthering the decline of reading. Specifically, he contends that the standard instructional practices used in most schools are killing reading by: • Valuing the development of test-takers over the development of lifelong readers; • Mandating breadth over depth in instruction; • Requiring students to read difficult texts without proper instructional support; • Insisting that students focus solely on academic texts; • Drowning great books with sticky notes, double-entry journals, and marginalia; • Ignoring the importance of developing recreational reading; • And losing sight of authentic instruction in the shadow of political pressures.
Kelly doesn’t settle for only identifying the problems. Readicide provides teachers, literacy coaches, and administrators with specific steps to reverse the downward spiral in reading—steps that will help prevent the loss of another generation of readers.
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About drcorretjer

Doctorate in Administrator Leadership for Teaching and Learning. Vast experience working with English language Learners and their families. Has successfully implemented programs that increased parental involvement in schools and professional collaboration among teachers. Has presented at local, state, and national levels on the topics of curriculum and best teaching practices for English Language Learners. Specialized in alternative assessments for English Language Learners to include portfolios. My goal at this time is to mentor,and nurture new teachers or prospective teachers. I'd like to create a bridge between their college education and the realities of a public school classroom. I believe we can attract and retain the best and the brightest if we provide them with a real foundation and help them be successful. Our children deserve that. Publications: Listen to me: Exploring students' voices regarding homework Lambert Academic Publishing |May 11, 2011 Most of the research conducted about homework is based on adults’ perspectives. This case study explored the perspectives of 5th and 6th grade students in comparison with 10 teachers’ perceptions regarding homework completion. The author administered questionnaires and conducted in depth interviews using a stratified purposive sample and extreme case sampling; which educed the participants’ perceptions and practices about homework. The students’ represented 4 distinct groups: English Language Learners, general education, gifted and talented and special education. The teachers’ instruct 5th and 6th grade. The results of the study indicate that students do not complete their homework because they find it too hard, boring, or they do not understand it. Interestingly, students think that worksheets are hard and boring. However, they are not against homework! This book should benefit teachers, parents, school administrators and staff developers. It would also help develop homework practices that would increase homework completion and student learning. This book brings out the voices of the students to the forefront. After all, they are the ones doing the homework. Listen to them!
This entry was posted in Defining equity, Tackling one issue at a time. Bookmark the permalink.

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